The Way To Diagnose Calcaneal Apophysitis?

Overview

Pain in the heel of a child's foot, typically brought on by some form of injury or trauma, is sometimes Sever's Disease. The disease often mimics Achilles tendonitis, an inflammation of the tendon attached to the back of the heel. A tight Achilles tendon may contribute to Sever's Disease by pulling excessively on the growth plate of the heel bone. This condition is most common in younger children and is frequently seen in the active soccer, football or baseball player. Sport shoes with cleats are also known to aggravate the condition. Treatment includes calf muscle stretching exercises, heel cushions in the shoes, and/or anti-inflammatory medications. Consult your physician before taking any medications.

Causes

Sever disease, like other similar conditions (eg, Osgood-Schlatter disease, little-leaguer's elbow, and iliac apophysitis), is believed to be caused by decreased resistance to shear stress at the bone-growth plate interface. Studies have indicated that traction apophyses have a higher composition of fibrocartilage than epiphyses subjected more to axial load, which are composed predominantly of hyaline cartilage. The anatomy of the calcaneal apophysis lends to significant shear stress because of its vertical orientation and the direction of pull from the strong gastrocnemius-soleus muscle group.

Symptoms

Most children with Sever's complain of pain in the heel that occurs during or after activity (typically running or jumping) and is usually relieved by rest. The pain may be worse when wearing cleats. Sixty percent of children's with Sever's report experiencing pain in both heels.

Diagnosis

To diagnose the cause of the child?s heel pain and rule out other more serious conditions, the foot and ankle surgeon obtains a thorough medical history and asks questions about recent activities. The surgeon will also examine the child?s foot and leg. X-rays are often used to evaluate the condition. Other advanced imaging studies and laboratory tests may also be ordered.

Non Surgical Treatment

If your child suffers from Sever?s Disease, it is important you take him or her to see your podiatrist, as it can take some time for the condition to completely resolve. Possible treatment options for Sever?s disease may include. Rest from aggravating activities. Ice massage to reduce localised inflammation. Heel lifts placed inside the shoe to reduce the strain on the growth plate. Athletic footwear advice, poor footwear can sometimes be the major contributing factor in the development of Sever?s disease. Orthotic therapy, if your child has an abnormal foot posture that is contributing to the development of Sever?s disease, this will need to be treated with orthotic therapy. Orthotics for Sever?s disease may need to be prescription (custom-made) or non-prescription foot orthotics depending on your child?s foot posture, Exercise program, stretching exercises to improve flexibility of the leg muscles and strengthening exercises to address any foot muscle weakness or imbalance. Avoid barefoot walking, hill running and training on hard surfaces.

Prevention

The best way to prevent Sever's disease is to make sure that your child wears shoes that fit properly. The heel portion of the shoe should not be too tight, and there should be good padding in the heel. It may help to put extra heel pads in your child's shoes. Some children simply get too much physical activity. For example, they may play on too many teams or practice for too long. Their heel pain is a message to slow down.

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